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The LEGO House opening soon & new website!

by admin on February 14, 2017

in Community News

A few years ago LEGO announced that they are working on a new project in Billund, Denmark called the LEGO House – a new tourist attraction that combines a LEGO store, fun and educational experiences, restaurants and more. The project is now getting close to completion, and LEGO launched a website with detailed information on this very exciting attraction. So let’s take a look. 🙂

The LEGO House will offer activities with and without a ticket. With a ticket, you’ll get access to the six Experience Zones. Without a ticket you can visit LEGO Square, play on the terraces, explore the LEGO store and get tasty food with a LEGO twist at one of the three eateries.

The layout of the LEGO House follows the structure of the five learning competencies activated through play. The Red Zone allows you to unleash your creative powers and build the creations of your imagination with an unending supply of LEGO bricks. At the Green Zone you can play with others and even direct your own movie. The Blue Zone is all about playing with logic, and gives you a chance to be an urban architect and control robots at the Robo Lab. Finally, the Yellow Zone lets you breathe life into your very own LEGO animals. Build fish and set them loose in the giant aquariums to make their way amongst sharks and octopi. Or you can build spiders, frogs, snails and other creatures that magically slither and crawl.

The top of the LEGO House – which resembles a giant LEGO brick – is home to Masterpiece Gallery. Here you will discover some of the amazing and breathtaking LEGO masterpieces, built by LEGO fans from around the world. The pieces on exhibit are handpicked by the gallery’s curators and rotated on a regular basis to ensure that something new and interesting is always on display.

At the History Collection, you will learn how a small furniture workshop in Billund became a world-renowned brand, through various  product displays, photos, and film. You’ll also discover the 500 most iconic LEGO sets ever made – and perhaps you’ll even find your own favorite set from long ago…

When you get hungry, you can stop by to grab some food at the tree eateries. Café Brickachino is your go-to place for a quick snack or a light lunch. They serve hot and cold beverages, sandwiches and desserts in a casual atmosphere with a slight LEGO twist. The Brick-a-meal family restaurant serves a great lunch or dinner full of LEGO fun as you build your order with LEGO bricks. The Mezzanine is the place to go for an evening out with business partners or friends. This fine dining restaurant serves culinary gastronomy with a fun and subtle LEGO twist. This gourmet restaurant requires advanced reservation, while at the other two places you can stop by at any time.

And of course, there is going to be a LEGO store too! It is located in the middle of the LEGO House, facing out towards LEGO Square. The shop is filled to the brim with the latest LEGO sets, fascinating special products, and one-of-a-kind LEGO experiences.

The LEGO House is going to open this fall. The opening hours will vary by season, but they will be open daily with a few exceptions throughout the year for holidays and special events. You can stay at the LEGO House as long as you like within the opening hours, but you must book tickets in advance if you wish to visit the Experience Zones. The Experience Zones close earlier than the rest of the LEGO House, so make sure you leave enough time to see it all. According to the website, a visit to the Experience Zones typically lasts three to four hours. Additional time should be allotted for parking, playing on the terraces, visiting the LEGO store and any plans to dine at the three restaurants. Basically, it appears to be a very similar experience to most theme-parks and other attractions where you can spend a whole day.

So how much all of this cost? As mentioned above, a good part of the LEGO House is going to be open without a ticket, but if you want to visit the Experience Zones, you will need to purchase tickets in advance. The website list ticket prices for both adults and children as 199 DKK, which is less than $30. Children under 2 years of age get free entry. Ticket sales will start in June.

This is just a summary of the information that available at the LEGO House website. You can learn more about each attraction, and also plan your visit with suggestions for travel, accommodations and nearby attractions. The FAQ section is particularly useful and answers pretty much every question you might have in regards to purchasing tickets, parking, group visits, storage lockers, accommodations with people with special needs, dining, and more.

Also, I should note that there is a LEGO set that was first released in 2014 with a micro version of the LEGO House, including an exclusive minifigure. The #4000010 LEGO House is only available in Billund, Denmark, but if you are interested you can also find it on eBay: LEGO HOUSE ON EBAY

What do you think? Are you excited about the LEGO House? Would you like to visit? Are you planning to go after it opens? Which area sounds most interesting to you? Feel free to share your thoughts and discuss in the comment section below! 😉

And you might also like to check out the following related posts:

{ 12 comments… read them below or add one }

PrashBricks February 14, 2017 at 11:12 AM

Wow!

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admin February 14, 2017 at 11:46 AM

Yeah…. a LEGO fan’s dream place! They should really allow us to move in there! 😀

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PrashBricks February 14, 2017 at 12:27 PM

Yes, indead!

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Xevo February 14, 2017 at 12:50 PM

The Blue and Yellow areas sound the most interesting to me, I told my wife that I’ll be ready to plan a Denmark trip once this opens hahah!

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admin February 14, 2017 at 1:28 PM

Yep, a trip to Denmark to the holy land of LEGO is very reasonable! 🙂

I also like the Blue and Yellow Zones, but I also want to see what a “unending supply of LEGO bricks” looks like in the Red Zone. I think most LEGO fans would have a pretty big imagination in this regard. I don’t want LEGO to sell us short. 🙄

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jabber-baby-wocky February 14, 2017 at 2:46 PM

WOW! Better start saving now! Is flying to Denmark expensive? Is this far from the airport? Is there a hotel nearby? Is this close to the factory? So many questions!

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admin February 14, 2017 at 4:37 PM

For travel and accommodations there is quite a bit of helpful info on the Plan Your Visit page: https://www.lego.com/en-gb/legohouse/plan-your-visit/getting-here. According to the website, Billund International Airport is located just 3 kilometers from the LEGO House, and offers direct flights to most of Europe. To get there from the US of course would depend on which city you are flying from and what time of the year. I just looked up the address of the LEGO House (Ole Kirks Plads 1 7190 Billund Denmark) on Google Earth. It is very close to the factory. Billund is a small place. 🙂

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Håkan February 14, 2017 at 7:31 PM

The main airport in Denmark is Copenhagen Airport in Kastrup.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copenhagen_Airport

Billund would have been even smaller without Lego, though. The company supports the entire town.

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Håkan February 14, 2017 at 7:42 PM

Hotels in Billund are listed at Wikitravel.

http://wikitravel.org/en/Billund

There are 6. 000 persons living in Billund, on an area about 500 km² (200 square miles, it seems). And a lot of Lego-related business and activities are clustered fairly close to each other…

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admin February 14, 2017 at 9:10 PM

Oh, nice! Thanks for sharing that! I knew some of our European friends can help out! 😀

Gosh! I thought I live in a small place, and we have almost 130,000 people. 🙄

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Håkan February 16, 2017 at 6:19 AM

The whole of Denmark is only close to 6 million…

And around 2 million of them live in the Copenhagen Metropolitan area…

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admin February 16, 2017 at 10:44 AM

That’s so tiny… but it might not be a bad thing. It’s probably easier to manage a small country. Although it also means that they likely have to get a lot of needed resources from outside. My cousin just moved to Denmark at the beginning of the year (Copenhagen). He says that everyone is riding bikes. That’s nice. 🙂

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