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Largest exclusive LEGO sets 2010 – 2016

by admin on November 9, 2016

in LEGO Exclusives

As we are almost at the end of the year, I thought this was a good time for an annual review of the largest LEGO sets released during 2016. This has been a particularly interesting period, because the number of big sets almost doubled compared to previous years. In fact, let’s start out with a short comparison, before discussing the current year. 🙂

#71040 LEGO Disney Castle Display 1

LARGE EXCLUSIVE LEGO SETS 2010: There were a total of three large sets over 2,000 pieces this year, the largest being over 4,000 pieces! The largest set was the #10214 LEGO Creator Tower Bridge (still available, see link) with 4,287 pieces and a price of $239.99. The second largest set was the #10212 LEGO Star Wars Imperial Shuttle with 2,503 pieces and a price of $259.99. The third largest set was the #10211 LEGO Creator Grand Emporium with 2,182 pieces and a price of $149.99. All other sets had less than 2,000 pieces.

largest-lego-sets-2010

LARGE EXCLUSIVE LEGO SETS 2011: There were a total of five large sets over 2,000 pieces this year. The largest LEGO set released in 2010 was the #10221 LEGO Star Wars Ultimate Collector Series Super Star Destroyer with 3,152 pieces and a price of $399.99. The second largest set was the #21010 LEGO Architecture Robie House with 2,276 pieces and a price of $199.99. The third largest set was the #8110 LEGO Technic Mercedes-Benz Unimog U 400 with 2,048 pieces and a price of $199.99. The fourth largest set was the #10218 LEGO Creator Pet Shop (retiring soon) with 2,032 pieces and a price of $149.99. The fifth largest set was the #10217 LEGO Harry Potter Diagon Alley with 2,025 pieces and a price of $149.99. All other sets had less than 2,000 pieces. Note that only one set had over 3,000 pieces and costs over $200.

largest-lego-sets-2011

LARGE EXCLUSIVE LEGO SETS 2012: Looks like in 2012 LEGO decided to be even more conservative, as no sets reached 3,000 pieces or costs more than $200. There were a total of three large sets over 2,000 pieces. The largest set released was the #10224 LEGO Creator Town Hall with 2,766 pieces and a price of $199.99. The second largest set was the #10225 LEGO Star Wars R2-D2 with 2,127 pieces and a price of $179.99. The third largest set was the #10228 LEGO Monster Fighters Haunted House with 2,064 pieces and a price of $179.99. All other sets had less than 2,000 pieces.

largest-lego-sets-2012

LARGE EXCLUSIVE LEGO SETS 2013: This year is about the same as the previous one, with no set reaching 3,000 pieces, and only three sets were over $200. There were four large sets over 2,000 pieces. The largest set released was the #10234 LEGO Creator Sydney Opera House (retiring soon) with 2,989 pieces and a price of $319.99. The second largest set was the #42009 LEGO Technic Mobile Crane MK II with 2,606 pieces and a price of $219.99. The third largest set was the #10237 LEGO The Lord of the Rings Tower of Orthanc with 2,359 pieces and a price of $199.99. The fourth largest set was the #10232 LEGO Creator Palace Cinema with 2,196 pieces and a price of $149.99. The fifth largest set was the #10236 LEGO Star Wars Ewok Village (retiring soon) with 1,999 pieces and a price of $249.99. (It is only one piece below the 2K threshold, so I added it here, plus it is considered a LEGO Star Wars Ultimate Collectors Series set, so it deserves to be mentioned.) All other sets had less than 2,000 pieces.

largest-lego-sets-2013

LARGE EXCLUSIVE LEGO SETS 2014: This year there were four large sets over 2,000 pieces, with one of the sets reaching over 3,000 pieces. As far as price, only two sets were over $200. The largest set was the #75059 LEGO Star Wars Ultimate Collector Series Sandcrawler (retiring soon) with 3,296 pieces and a price of $299.99. The second largest set was the #70810 LEGO Movie MetalBeard’s Sea Cow with 2,741 pieces and a price of $249.99. The third largest set was the #71006 LEGO The Simpsons House with 2,523 pieces and a price of $199.99. The fourth largest set was the #10243 LEGO Creator Parisian Restaurant with 2,469 pieces and a price of $159.99. All other sets had less than 2,000 pieces.

largest-lego-sets-2014

LARGE EXCLUSIVE LEGO SETS 2015: In 2015 LEGO started to get bolder and released six large sets over 2,000 pieces, and one that almost reached the 2K threshold. But there were no sets over 3,000 pieces, and only two sets costs above $200. The largest set in 2015 was the #76042 LEGO Super Heroes SHIELD Helicarrier with 2,996 pieces and a price of $349.99. The second largest set was the #42043 LEGO Technic Mercedes-Benz Arocs 3245 with 2,793 pieces and a price of $229.99. The third largest set was the #10247 LEGO Creator Ferris Wheel with 2,464 pieces and a price of $199.99. The fourth largest set was the #10246 LEGO Creator Detective’s Office with 2,264 pieces and a price of $159.99. The fifth largest set was the #71016 LEGO The Simpsons Kwik-E-Mart with 2,179 pieces and a price of $199.99. The sixth largest set was the #70751 LEGO Ninjago Temple of Airjitzu with 2,208 pieces and a price of $199.99. Honorable mention goes to the seventh largest set, which is just below the 2K piece threshold; the #75060 LEGO Star Wars Ultimate Collector Series Slave I with 1,996 pieces and a price of $199.99. All other sets had less than 2,000 pieces.

largest-lego-sets-2015

LARGE EXCLUSIVE LEGO SETS 2016: And here we are in 2016, with an unprecedented nine large sets over 2,000 pieces, four of which are over 4,000 pieces and one almost reaching 5K. And eight of the nine sets are over $200. If you look at the pattern of the previous years, you can see that this is completely unheard of. The largest set in 2016 is the #75827 LEGO Ghostbusters Firehouse Headquarters with 4,634 pieces and a price of $349.99. The second largest set is the #10253 LEGO Creator Big Ben with 4,163 pieces and a price of $249.99. The third largest set is the #71040 LEGO Disney Castle with 4,080 pieces and a price of $349.99. The fourth largest set is the #75159 LEGO Star Wars Death Star with 4,016 pieces and a (crazy) price of $499.99. The fifth largest set is the #42055 LEGO Technic Bucket Wheel Excavator with 3,927 pieces and a price of $279.99. The sixth largest set is the #42056 LEGO Technic Porsche 911 GT3 RS with 2,704 pieces and a price of $299.99. The seventh largest set is the #76052 LEGO Super Heroes Batman Classic TV Series Batcave with 2,526 pieces and a price of $269.99. The eight largest set is the #10251 LEGO Creator Brick Bank with 2,380 pieces and a price of $169.99. And the ninth largest set of 2016 is the #75098 LEGO Star Wars Assault on Hoth with 2,144 pieces and a price of $249.99. All other sets have less than 2,000 pieces.

largest-lego-sets-2016

While in previous years all of the large exclusive sets received pretty much universally positive reviews, 2016 is a bit troubled in this regard. From the nine sets released, the #75827 LEGO Ghostbusters Firehouse Headquarters, the #10253 LEGO Creator Big Ben, the #71040 LEGO Disney Castle, the #42055 LEGO Technic Bucket Wheel Excavator, the #42056 LEGO Technic Porsche 911 GT3 RS, and the #10251 LEGO Creator Brick Bank are all considered very solid sets. On the other hand, the #76052 LEGO Super Heroes Batman Classic TV Series Batcave, and the #75098 LEGO Star Wars Assault on Hoth received a lot of criticism for some of the design decisions. And while the #75159 LEGO Star Wars Death Star is a good set, it is almost exactly the same as the previous version, but for a $100 more. So from the nine sets, six are definite winners, while the remaining three are a bit questionable.

#75098 LEGO Star Wars Assault on Hoth

While it is nice to see so many large sets, the significant rise in piece-count and price is troubling to some LEGO fans. Previously, with a well-managed budget, most LEGO fans had no trouble picking up the large exclusive sets they liked each year, or even all of them. However in 2016 only one set is below $200, five are between $200-$300, two are $350, and one is $500. That’s a lot. And of course this means that LEGO fans need to pick and choose their favorite large sets more carefully, plan ahead accordingly, and also manage their budget even more vigilantly. And we haven’t even taken into consideration many of the excellent smaller sets that were released this year! I’m curious to see if LEGO will continue to flood the market with extra-large sets next year, or will cut back some to the previous levels to focus on quality and keep the uniqueness of the exclusives.

shop-lego-holiday-giftshop

If you are considering purchasing any of the large exclusive sets before the end of the year, I would suggest that you check out reviews of the sets to make sure you end up getting the one you would be the most happy about. The sets come from a wide variety of themes (LEGO Creator, LEGO Technic, LEGO Star Wars, LEGO Super Heroes, LEGO Ghostbusters, and LEGO Disney), so there is something for everyone. Also, remember that some of the older sets from previous years are still available, but are scheduled to retire soon (see: LEGO Sets Retiring Soon & Sales and Deals). You can find both the current and previous large exclusive sets under their respective themes and under the Exclusives and the Hard to Find section of the Online LEGO Shop.

shop-lego-exclusives-2016

What do you think? How do you like the 2016 selection of large exclusive sets? Do you think there are too many of them? Or would you like to see even more? Which one is your favorite set this year? What about previous years? And which sets you don’t like? Feel free to share your thoughts and discuss in the comment section below! 😉

And you might also like to check out the following related posts:

LEGO SHOP IN USA: Online LEGO Shop USA
LEGO Brand Retail

LEGO SHOP IN CANADA: Online LEGO Shop Canada
LEGO Canada

LEGO SHOP IN UK: Online LEGO Shop UK
LEGO SYSTEM A/S

{ 24 comments… read them below or add one }

Bart November 9, 2016 at 10:24 AM

Hi, could anyone help me? I would like to know when and where did LEGO first come up with a pick-a-brick wall… Thanks!!!

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admin November 9, 2016 at 2:26 PM

Bart, according to Wikipedia it was in 2002 or shortly after: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Lego_Group

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Legostuff71 November 9, 2016 at 2:12 PM

I still want to get the Assault on Hoth set, it will go great with my Echo base set. I know a lot of fans gave a bad review on it . Who cares , it’s STAR WARS and if you don’t like it improve it . LEGO can’t always make things the way we want it all the time ( even though they try there hardest and does make it happen from time to time.) LEGO encourage s us to be creative on our building . So, create.

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admin November 9, 2016 at 2:27 PM

I agree. The Hoth set is not bad in itself, it is just not a standard UCS set – that’s what most fans were upset about. But as a set it is quite fun with lots of play-features and a very versatile modular layout.

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ilariel November 10, 2016 at 3:09 AM

“But as a set it is quite fun with lots of play-features and a very versatile modular layout.” -> True, but thats not what I expect from an UCS set. The best way to describe what I do expect from an UCS set is…. ISD. Unfortunatelly, Lego does’nt seem to thing same way and UCS are becoming “big” playable sets 🙁

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Håkan November 10, 2016 at 8:38 AM

ISD?…

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admin November 10, 2016 at 12:06 PM

I assume ilariel is referring to the Imperial Star Destroyer, which is considered one of the awesomest UCS set. 😉

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Håkan November 11, 2016 at 10:37 AM

Is that 10221 or some other set?

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admin November 11, 2016 at 10:48 AM

Yeah, that one. 🙄

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ilariel November 18, 2016 at 2:39 AM

Exactly. Sorry for not set the reply on time, but i thought i subscribed to the comments feed and i didnt 🙁

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admin November 18, 2016 at 12:42 PM

No problem, I’m always around, and go through all comments as they come in. 🙂

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admin November 10, 2016 at 12:05 PM

Yes, that’s why the set is getting so much flack. But if you can look past the UCS designation, it is quite fun.

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ilariel November 18, 2016 at 2:38 AM

I won’t deny that they have some great playability. But as the UCS collector I am its hard to understand the fact that i will have to pay near 300$ for a bounch of small and playable sets join together in a big box 🙁

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admin November 18, 2016 at 12:42 PM

Yes, I agree. Both the price and the UCS logo are unreasonable. Still, it is a fun playset. I hope that sometime in the near future LEGO will lower the price to something more reasonable. They can’t change the UCS logo, but they can certainly do something about the price. 😉

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Icepacklady November 9, 2016 at 2:23 PM

Nice to see I actually have a couple of those sets, although they aren’t assembled.

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admin November 9, 2016 at 2:28 PM

I don’t know how you do that. When I get a new set I drop everything and start building; day or night, raining or shining, doesn’t matter. 🙄

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gid617 November 11, 2016 at 7:44 AM

I never understand that either. How can anyone sleep with unopened LEGO sets in their house? ;P

Okay, sometimes when I buy something large on vacation, it has to wait, but otherwise… !

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ilariel November 18, 2016 at 2:45 AM

I do have 3 of them still in their box (TIE UCS, Sandcrawler and the Super Star Destroyer). The main issue here is the absolute lack of space to have them assembled at home 🙁

BTW, i don’t see the TIE UCS (75095) in your list, was launched on 2015 like the Slave I

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admin November 18, 2016 at 12:40 PM

I did not mention #75095 because of the low part-count. As I mentioned in the article, the cut-off point I used was 2,000 pieces. I did list some sets that were only a few pieces away from 2K, but the TIE is well below, so I didn’t add it to the list. Yeah, unfortunately space is always an issue with big sets. 🙁

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Legostuff71 November 9, 2016 at 3:37 PM

Same here, But, I do try and pace myself . I don’t want to build lot of sets in one day ( I don’t have that much patience s or time. Mostly time is the issue.) I do however make sure I do some sorta LEGO building everyday ( It keeps the voices in my head quiet .LOL!)

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admin November 9, 2016 at 8:31 PM

I don’t have much patience either. The modulars are pretty much the largest sets I can build in one sitting. I know people who first sort all the bricks neatly, then line up all the studs so the LEGO logo all face one way… I can’t do that. 😀

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Håkan November 11, 2016 at 10:38 AM

In some sets, it’s impossible to achieve, though… Damn set designers! 😉

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admin November 11, 2016 at 10:48 AM

Naw, as a LEGO fan you should never say impossible. There is always some way… there must be… 😀

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TheBrickLot November 10, 2016 at 1:53 PM

“…four of which are over 4,000 pieces and one almost reaching 4K.” Um.. I believe you mean 5K…

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